How to direct your horse by leg cues

There are many confusing schools of thought regarding the position of leg cues. For me the proof is in the doing. When you don’t use your rein, does your horse respond appropriately to you leg? If so, great.

Even if you don’t use the leg aids we do, but your horse has been conditioned to respond there is no reason to change. Unless of course your horse responds, but falls on the forehand. Then you may consider adjusting your leg positions.

This video deals with the isolations for foundation riding. Isolating the cues makes it simple for the horse to understand, and riding with one cue at a time builds lightness to the aids. Obviously, a 10-minute video isn’t going to show how to get these cues perfect.

This video assumes you know the basics of a decent program well. It doesn’t have to be the Heartfelt program.. most in-depth Natural Horsemanship programs will cover the basics needed to get the most out of this video. Even a true CLASSICAL dressage education would give you a foundation to get more from this video.

It is important to differentiate between using legs to direct a horse, and asking for a certain bend. When we are being particular about a certain bend we need a combination of cues. What seems to have happened is that many conventional teachers have chosen to isolate the turn using inside leg. In my opinion, this directs the hind end. It will turn the horse, but it means the hind legs move around the front end. In other words: the horse falls on the forehand.

Then the rider is told to use more leg, use more rein, or try some medieval gadget or another to get the horse off the forehand. Once again, this is my opinion, and in my experience fixing the confusion linked to leg and rein cues is a great start to fixing things like napping, falling on the forehand, and lead departs.

HQ Magazine

AskHQ: Splints

Q: What causes splints in horses? A: Splints are inflammation or injury of the splint bones in the lower leg and/or the adjacent bones (such as the canon bone) and/or the associated ligaments. Splints are most commonly seen in young horses training at very high intensity levels, such as Thoroughbreds.

Read More »
HQ Magazine

AskHQ: Colour vision

Q: What colours can horses see? A: Horses are not colour blind but they can’t see the same colours as we do. Horses have what we call ‘dichromatic vision’, meaning that they differentiate colours in two wavelength regions. Humans have ‘trichromatic vision’, meaning that we see in three-colour wavelengths. Horses

Read More »
Lifestyle

Matteo’s Restaurant at Annabel’s – Mayfair, London, UK

The British eccentric interior design is a bit excessive for those of us with minimalist leanings, but if anyone can handle it, it would be Martin Brudnizki https://mbds.com/. The new owner of the private club Annabel’s, Richard Caring, often taps Brudnizki as he did when he moved Annabel’s in 2018  and again this year, when he […]

The post Matteo’s Restaurant at Annabel’s – Mayfair, London, UK appeared first on The Cool Hunter.

Read More »
HQ Magazine

AskHQ: Double trouble

Q: How often do horses have twins? A: Twins are conceived as a result of the stallion’s sperm fertilising two eggs released when a mare double ovulates. Thoroughbreds and Warmbloods are the most likely to have mutliple ovulations, and they therefore tend to have more twins than other breeds. However,

Read More »
HQ Magazine

AskHQ: Falling safely

Q: What is the best way to fall off safely? A: When we ride, we of course aim to stay on the horse at all times! However, horses are unpredictable and some situations are simply out of our control. Each fall is circumstantial and we often don’t have enough time

Read More »